Theology is currently dying a slow death – at least in the manner it has been ‘reasoned’ over the past decades. As Daniel Taylor in The Myth of Certainty has pointed out all-too-well, our personal and corporate faith needs to be challenged, that it must be reflective, and never arrogantly complacent, lest it be built on sandy soil. The task/risk of asking — even as a mature person of faith — and musing alongside Pilate in John 18:38 “What is Truth?” is far less than the risk of ignoring the depth found in discovering truth.

Truth travels best across the bridge of authentic relationships and tested/forged in coversation – it doesn’t thrive in the hothouse of our heads. Theology has been for too long an isolated discipline unto itself. The time has come to throw open the gates of the “mighty fortress” and invite all conversation partners to the party. Time to move aside the era of the ‘theologian’ and welcome the rise of the ‘theoblogian’…

had one of ‘those’ phone calls today – you might know what I am talking about – those phone calls where you have been awaiting news of something and when the phone rings, you see the phone number on caller ID as being ‘the call I am waiting for’, and then… nothing. The person on the line begins to talk in such generalities and abstractions that there is no substance and as the phone is hung up, you are left with anticipation morphing slowly into frustation. We can experience this in so many ways – waiting for news from a doctor reagrding the status of a dying loved one, the call from a job offer that has yet to be made, the prayer that has been asked over and over on your knees only to hear confirmation that the prayer has been…heard.

part of the paradoxical life of faith seems to be learning to rest amidst the unanswered answer – to be still in waiting when the waiting is both over and not over at the same time. in short, it is learning that even when we get an “answer” from the voice on the line – there is always more waiting to be done.

One of the reasons I like bands such as The Innocence Mission and Over the Rhine is that they are bands who see music as creatings openings in our lives that make room for uncomfortable silences and whispers that help us to practice sitting in a space of unsettled settling. Listening through such songs help prepare us to be ready for when the phone rings and voice on the line offers sound but no structure…

I recently wrote a review of the latest U2 album – How to Dismatle an Atomic Bomb – for The Other Journal and it is posted here. I am looking forward to the concert tour stopping in Seattle – should be a great show and will be interesting to see how the band holds up after the Hall of Fame induction… surely one of the quicks ways for a band to fade away! I have been listening to “Pride (In the Name of Love)”this week as this is the anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s death – “early morning, April 4/ shot rings out in a Memphis sky/ free at last/ they took your life, but couldn’t take your pride…”

TS Eliot stated in The Wasteland that “April is the cruelest month” – this is turning out to be such a month. After a year of working through various vocational options, I have shut one door to a very good offer and am now awaiting the next “knock, knock Neo” in relation to two faculty appointments. Going back to teaching again is thrilling but still it is change. There is stillness after choices, and yesterday shutting the door on one option has a peaceful repose. I will lean into that for now and await the white rabbit. More later…