Doctrine and the obstacle to life – Walsh’s book

I am reading David Walsh’s The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence right now and am just thunderstruck with how clean, concise and thoughful he is.  A fantastic read and truly a must for my continental geek friends out there.

Here is a great takeaway on the nature of Faith as Walsh reflects on the legacy of Søren Kierkegaard:

Faith is always in what we cannot know.  It is not merely a substitute for knowledge, but is of an utterly different order from knowledge.  What is known is over or possessed; what is believed is lived.  So it is precisely the nonpossibility of knowledge that constitutes faith and existence.  Just as the ideas of philosophy had become the principal barrier to the life of philosophy, the historical doctrines of Christianity had become the main obstacle to the life of Christianity.

Is Walsh arguing for an abandonment of the tradition and history of the Christian church?  No – I think in many ways this is his attempt to recapture the very intention of the ecumenical councils that have somehow become lost in the early years of the 21st cenutry.   As he states so well – what is truly believed is lived.  It becomes that simple.  To merely articulate beliefs without living them out is to plunge into a disembodied pit of reason without recourse, affirmation of so-called truth without the evidence of truthfulness in time and space.

I will be chiming in on this reading journey in the weeks to come from time to time.  Worth picking up fer sure!

1 Comment

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  1. nicely put, jeff…. now, how the HS makes possible the embodiment of such faith – your next blog? 🙂

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